Please note: the viewport design is copied from Steve Den Beste's excellent blog, USS Clueless. Used with permission.


Friday, March 26, 2004  

More Fun With Mandarin

Today's Meg lessson is about using <DIV> frames for an image. Over at Mandarin Design, Meg shows us how and then comments that the image looks better with a white background, despite all the framing work...

I think the key is to lighten up the background. Here's the Mandarin original and then two with my suggestion:



Andy's Barn

We went back to Andy's barn and found this fabric. Andy went to a rest home a few months ago and the old farm house was abandoned. The developers are cleaning out generations of "trash". We found some fabric and a hand-made doll that was in the room where Andy's mother used to live.




Andy's Barn

We went back to Andy's barn and found this fabric. Andy went to a rest home a few months ago and the old farm house was abandoned. The developers are cleaning out generations of "trash". We found some fabric and a hand-made doll that was in the room where Andy's mother used to live.




Andy's Barn
We went back to Andy's barn and found this fabric. Andy went to a rest home a few months ago and the old farm house was abandoned. The developers are cleaning out generations of "trash". We found some fabric and a hand-made doll that was in the room where Andy's mother used to live.



If you right-click and look at the source, you can see that I've made the background the same tone, but lighter in color. (Or you can go over to Mandarin and look at Meg's code, which is the same as what I used here and just replace the background colors with the ones I show here: The original background is taken from the base of the picture, #8BB4AE. The middle one is lighter, by one tick: #9BC4BE. The lowest one is better, I think: #BBE4DE. Notice that I'm keeping the overall grey-tone the same by increasing all three parts of the RGB (red-green-blue): 8B to 9B to BB, B4 to C4 to E4, AE to BE to DE. This way you can see that the colors are related, but lighter, and that makes the image and the background relate (IMHO...).

Update: Meg took a look (after I left a comment on her blog) — she likes the lightest one but suggested making it lighter yet, so here's #CBF4EE:



Andy's Barn

We went back to Andy's barn and found this fabric. Andy went to a rest home a few months ago and the old farm house was abandoned. The developers are cleaning out generations of "trash". We found some fabric and a hand-made doll that was in the room where Andy's mother used to live.


Ok, I thought about it and realized that if you keep the RGB relations more or less constant, there's a max — when one of the colors hits FF you can't go any higher. So here's the max: #D6FFF9:



Andy's Barn

We went back to Andy's barn and found this fabric. Andy went to a rest home a few months ago and the old farm house was abandoned. The developers are cleaning out generations of "trash". We found some fabric and a hand-made doll that was in the room where Andy's mother used to live.



One thing I noticed: when I went to art school, they made a big thing about relative colors. If you look back up there, the first two look like the background and the picture base color seem almost the same (although the backgrounds are clearly different). The relations among the colors affect how the ones around them look. So I've been keeping the color values additively similar (i.e., I've been adding the same amount to each of the Red-Green-Blue values). But I don't really know if that's exactly valid: adding 16 or 32 seems to me to look similar, but the last one (where I added 11 to each RGB value, because the Green value topped out at FF) doesn't really seem as much like the others as the +16 ones. I'll have to look around and see if there's an article about RGB relationships (sometime when the connection doesn't keep dropping, which it's doing about every minute right now -- connection dropped five times while I write this paragraph). Now we'll see if I can get this into blogger...





posted by Gary Williams at 11:17 PM | link |


Thursday, March 25, 2004  

A Poem For Peotry — uh, Poetry

It might be said that for the dread
of classical thought I tend,
but then I find that what comes to mind
is the wholesomeness of the word "dread".

You might think it strange that someone deranged or defanged or defensive or ought
might think it so easy to make the word queasily strong
for the work of the thought.

But it's easy to see that it's not just the bee
that the honey's for
but also the bought.
        —Gary Williams

posted by Gary Williams at 12:41 AM | link |
 

via whiskey river
Sure, spring depended on you.
Many stars lined up
hoping you'd notice.
A wave rose towards you
out of the past
or a violin
offered itself
As you passed an open window.
These were instructions, your mission.
But could you perform it?
Weren't you always distracted
Waiting for something
As if all this was announcing
A lovers arrival?
Rainer Maria Rilke

posted by Gary Williams at 12:19 AM | link |


Wednesday, March 24, 2004  

via Pax Nortana

Anaphora

by Joel Sax

I quoted Joel's poem here, but Joel sent me a rude note (and has a rude message on his blog) claiming copyright. So I've removed it. And I won't quote him again.

posted by Gary Williams at 11:41 PM | link |
 

via Easy Bake Coven

:: {Haiku For You}
The battery's dead
I thank you for jumping me
Fixing the car, too

Give me ambiguity or give me something else.

posted by Gary Williams at 10:55 PM | link |
 

via Kalilily Time

still life with lunch


I eat my baguette and brie
contemplating a miniature collection
of my life's best metaphors,
nested now into a frame of small squares

set off-center in an expanse
of off-white wall--
spiny shells and chunks of stones
bought and stolen from gritty beaches
and hallowed grounds;

two miniature totem poles,
stacks of toothy masks eternally
divining and defying;

the ceramic face of a serene Kwan Yin,
open hands inserted
in stiff maternal blessing;

a pious, pewtered St. Anthony,
haloed, holding the lost Child,
on the lookout for lost keys;

a feather, probably a duck's
because a turkey's was too big to fit,
and every altar needs a feather;

a brass double dorje, the mate
of the Tibetan bell I ring
in moments of turning
toward thoughts of a box-less future;

and, finally, a crumbling wine bottle cork
on which someone I can't
remember had printed
in balky blue ballpoint:
"Conundrum."



Update:

via Joel at Pax Nortana
Pardon me Gary, while I use this opportunity to announce a new blog dedicated to a bimonthly poetry meme:

http://boutsrimes.notfrisco2.com/

I'm so wicked!


(From the comments -- almost instant, good shot, Joel...)

posted by Gary Williams at 3:09 PM | link |
 

via Fantastic Metropolis: Fiction: Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town

Cory Doctorow Announces Finishing New Book

From Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town, an urban fantasy about wireless networking, dumpster diving, and screwed up families, set in Toronto's Kensington Market.

The story is about a family spawned by a washing machine and a mountain, in Northern Ontario, whose brothers include among their number a clairvoyant, an island, a corpse, a trio of nesting dolls and Alan, who is variously called Andreas, Albert, Andy and anything else beginning with an 'A.' His friend Curt is a dumpster-diver who's chasing the dream of building a city-wide community wireless networking throughout Toronto.

Alan is being hounded by Davey (Danny, Dilbert, Dougie), a brother whom the other brothers conspired to murder, and who has been stalking them ever since his death. Now, Alan is confronted with him.
--Cory Doctorow


Cory sent a note to his mailing list that he finished the book! Click here for a look at an excerpt.

posted by Gary Williams at 2:15 PM | link |
 

via Franciss Breakspear
Hastur The Sigil

Hastur: A Blow Job: Wind, magic and chaos

Francis Breakspear

There is a long association with magicians working with the natural environment, including the weather. This piece deals very briefly with some manifestations of the Wind, and concludes with a practical piece on working with modern windmills.

The North Berwick witches were executed nearly 400 years ago for allegedly raising a storm to sink King James' ship. He survived, and tried them personally?

Hastur is a wind demon in the fiction associated with HP Lovecraft, that writer so beloved of many a magician. It seems that Hastur was actually a name borrowed from earlier authors, and a word that Lovecraft used only briefly. The 'Hastur who is the Wind Walker' is a literary invention of August Derleth, Lovecraft's executor and successor in the genre.
[more]

posted by Gary Williams at 11:56 AM | link |
 

via Penny Arcade!

'Someone Please Help, Scott Kurtz Is Being Eaten By A Crocodile.'


'It hurts,' thought Kurtz, while being chewed
'It is, of course, considered rude
To speak while one is eating, but
Mightn't one speak, when they are food?'

posted by Gary Williams at 10:39 AM | link |

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